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Trip Fact

  • Trip Name : Everest Expedition (South Side)
  • Difficulty : Moderate to Strenous
  • Trip Duration : 67 Days
  • Activity : Expedition

Everest Expedition (South Side)

The Mount Everest is the highest peak of the World 29028ft. (8848m.) through which the climbing toppers feel them selves as the most proud and adventurous person of the World. Sir Edmond Hillary and Late Tenzing Norge Sherpa first climbed this peak in May 29, 1953, after their long time's effort.

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The most popular choice among the mountaineers for Everest expedition is via the South Col which gives the most assured means of reaching the top. Time spent over 8000m is less in the approach to the summit on the south side as the summit is attempted in one push. Furthermore the south route has a good record of success due to the easy access of the route once it is opened by the first summiteers of the season.

The admired Everest expedition trail is followed to reach the base camp for the Everest expedition. A short walk along the moraine leads to the icefall with large crevasses which are considered one of the obstacles for the expedition. Our entirely experienced expedition Sherpa teams fix this section with ropes and ladders which makes easier for the climbers to cross this section to reach Camp 1. The terrain is gradual climb to reach the Camp 2. From here climbing on mixed snow and ice leads way up the Lhotse Face to Camp 3. From the camp 3 climbing on moderate mixed snow and rocks is not easy which leads to South Col- the Camp 4. The route steepens after ascending snow slopes to reach the crest of the South East Ridge and easy climbing and then again steep climbing leads to the South Summit. A short traverse to the Hillary Step and then climbing on short, steep rock and snow groove of notorious Hillary Step leads to the final ridge to the summit.

 

Day 01 - Arrive at Kathmandu airport (1345meters)

Day 02 – Visit old town of Kathmandu

Day 03 - Official formalities and Preparation day in Kathmandu

Day 04 - Final Preparation day in Kathmandu

Day 05 - Fly to Tenzing and Hillary Airport in Lukla (2804 meters) from Kathmandu, trek to Phakding (2610 meters)

Day 06- Trek to Namche Bazaar (3441 meters)

Day 07 - Namche Bazaar Acclimatization day

Day 08- Trek to Tengboche Monastery (3860 meters)

Day 09- Trek to Dingboche (4350 meters)

Day 10- Day trip to Chhukung valley (4710 meters) and trek back to Dingboche

Day 11- Trek to Lobuche (4910 meters) 5 hours

Day 12- Trek to Gorak Shep (5180 meters) then hike up to Kalapattar (5555 meters) back to Gorak Shep

Day 13- Trek to Everest Base Camp (5365 meters)

Day 14 to Day 17 – Base Camp Training and preparation

Day 18 to Day 61- Climbing period from Base camp to Summit and Back to the Base Camp

Day 62- Trek down to Pangboche (3930 meters)

Day 63- Trek to Namche Bazaar (3441 meters)

Day 64- Trek to Lukla (3404 meters)

Day 65- Flight from Lukla to Kathmandu in the morning

Day 66 - Leisure day in Kathmandu

Day 67- Transfer to international airport for your final flight departure

Day 1 - Arrive at Kathmandu (1,345m/4,413 ft)

Upon arriving at Tribhuwan International Airport in Kathmandu, you will be received by our airport representatives who will warmly greet you and transfer to the hotel on a private tourist vehicle. We provide 3-star accommodation in the city and we arrange for a trip briefing with dinner in the evening.

 

Day 2 - Visit old town of Kathmandu

A professional guide and vehicle are provided for a day of sightseeing in and around Kathmandu city. We visit some of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the city along with other interesting cultural monuments that dot the valley. These include Boudhanath Stupa (the largest Buddhist shrines in the world), Pashupatinath (the holiest Hindu temple in the world), Durbar Squares (Palaces and fortresses of medieval Kings), along with other popular cultural attractions. We get to observe the lifestyle of Nepalese people, holy sadhus and monks, fascinating history as well as awe-inspiring architecture.

 

Day 3 - Official formalities in Kathmandu.
Formal briefing at the Ministry of Tourism. The expedition leader will check that everyone’s equipment is in working order.

 

Day 4 - Final preparation day in Kathmandu.
Final opportunity for last-minute purchases.

 

Day 5 - Fly to Lukla and trek to Phakding.

An early morning start takes us to Tribhuwan International Airport in Kathmandu for the 35 minute scenic flight to Tenzing and Hillary Airport in Lukla (2804m). Upon arrival at the airport, a guide will meet us and introduce the porters before we begin the three hour trek to Phakding (2610m).

After landing there will be time to explore the village while the Sherpa crew sort and load the trekking equipment. We then begin our trek by descending towards the Dudh Kosi River where we join the main trail to Namche Bazaar, located just above Chaunrikharka (2713m). The walking is easy and after passing through the small village of Ghat (2550m), Phakding is just a short walk. Overnight at guesthouse.

 

Day 6 - Trek to Namche Bazaar.

We begin the five hour trek along the banks of the Dudh Kosi, crossing this majestic river many times on exciting suspension bridges laden with prayer flags. After entering Sagamartha National Park, the trail climbs steeply with breathtaking views. Namche Bazaar, known as the “Gateway to Everest,” is home to many quality restaurants, hotels, lodges, shops, money exchange, internet cafe and a bakery. Namche (3441m) is one of the biggest villages along the whole Everest trail. Overnight at guesthouse.

 

Day 7 - Namche Bazaar acclimatization day.

A day will be spent in Namche in order to adjust to the high altitude. We’ll go on a short trek to a museum celebrating the traditional customs of the Sherpa people. We will also hike up the Syangboche Airport around Everest View Hotel. From this point can be seen rewarding views of the Himalayas with a stunning sunrise and sunset over the panorama of Khumbu peaks. Overnight at guesthouse.

 

Day 8 - Trek to Tengboche Monastery.

The trek continues along the rushing glacial waters of the Dudh Kosi, with magnificent views of the mountains. We trek to an altitude of 3860 meters today. After five hours we’ll reach Tengboche, where the local monastery can be seen. Inside the monastery are incredibly ornate wall hangings, a twenty foot sculpture of Buddha, and the musical instruments and robes of the Lamas. The group will be taken to observe a prayer ceremony in either the evening or morning, depending on how the day’s trekking progressed. Overnight at guesthouse.

 

Day 9 - Trek to Dingboche.

From Thyangboche the trail drops to Debuche, crosses suspension bridge on the Imja Khola, and climbs to Pangboche amongst thousands of mani stones. Our uphill trek continues for six hours, taking us to the quaint traditional Sherpa village of Dingboche, with its exquisite views of Lhotse, Island Peak, and Ama Dablam. We’ll set a leisurely pace to adjust to the altitude (4350m). Overnight at guesthouse.

 

Day 10 - Day trip to Chhukung Valley.

Today is another day for acclimatization. We’ll have trip to Chhukung valley (4710m) via the Imja Khola valley, to see the marvelous view of the surrounding mountains, especially Lhotse’s massive south wall. Then we’ll return to Dingboche in the evening. Overnight at guesthouse.

 

Day 11 - Trek to Lobuche.

The trail continues for five hours today, along the lateral moraine of the Khumbu Glacier and passes by stone memorials for climbers who have perished on nearby summits. We continue to climb, heading to Lobuche (4910) - just a few huts at the foot of giant Lobuche peak. Some breathing problems may arise today due to the altitude. Overnight at guesthouse.

 

Day 12 - Trek to Gorak Shep, hike up Mt. Kala Patar, return to Gorak Shep.  

Most of this day is spent climbing Mt. Kala Patar, a small peak (by Himalayan standards) reaching 5555m. The ascent is demanding, but the climber gets the most magnificent mountain panorama possible: Everest, the highest point on the planet at 8848m (29,028ft), towers directly ahead and on all sides loom the other giants: Nuptse, Pumori, Chagatse, Lhotse. and countless other peaks. If possible we will stay and watch the awe-inspiring sunset over Everest and its neighbors. We make a quick descent to Gorak Shep, a tiny hamlet at 5180m. Overnight at guesthouse.

 

Day 13 - Trek to Everest base camp.

Contouring along the valley side, the trail leads on to the moraine of the Khumbu Glacier and becomes quite faint, weaving between mounds of rubble. After roughly four hours we will reach the base camp near the foot of the Khumbu Icefall (5365m). This will be home for the next few weeks. Overnight at tented camp.

 

Days 14 to 17 - Base camp training and preparation.

We set about acclimatizing and learning skills needed for climbing the mountain, such as how to use the oxygen bottles and radios. We will also sort out our equipment and clothing needed for the mountain, setting aside the food we want for the upper camps (as this will be placed there for us ahead of time by the Sherpa).

In preparation for climbing the summit, we’ll rest and adjust to the altitude, avoiding unnecessary exertion. We aim to make the base camp as comfortable as reasonably possible, with a heated triple-skin mess tent, individual tents for each climber to sleep in, broadband internet connection and satellite telephones.

Before venturing into the Khumbu Icefall, we will practice moving securely through complex ice terrain using ladders and fixed ropes. We train at the base camp and on the ice columns found at the lower edge of the icefall. As soon as the route through the icefall is prepared and training complete, we’ll make our first attempt at the icefall, aiming to climb halfway through and then back to base by  mid-morning. We’ll continue to progress higher until we can make our way through the icefall and all the way to Camp 1 in reasonable time.

While we grow accustomed to the ropes, ladders, and altitude, the Sherpas will be running loads through the icefall, into the Western Cwm and beyond.

 

Days 18 to 61 - Climbing period from Base camp to Summit and Back to the Base Camp.

Camp 1: 6400m (20,996ft).

The Camp 1 is situated on a horizontal area of deep snow sheltered by mountain walls. The area is warm due to sun’s reflection during the day, and at night the deep murmuring, cracking sounds of crevasses beneath the tents can be heard.

 

Camp 2: 6750m (22,145ft).

Camp 2 is set at the foot of the icy Lhotse wall. Expect cloudy but pleasant weather.

 

Camp 3: 7100m (23,292ft).

Camp 3, located adjacent to the Lhotse wall, is reached using fixed rope. The path takes us through the steep allow bands (lose, down-slopping, and rotten limestone). As we cross short a snowfield, the route takes us up the Geneva Spur to the east before coming to the flats of the South Col. Beyond Camp 3, some climbers may feel minor discomfort due to the altitude, and the use of oxygen may be necessary.

 

Camp 4: 8400m (27,560ft).

This is the last camp of the expedition and the riskiest section of the climb, just 450 meters from the summit. The narrow southeast ridge is taken to attain the south summits (8,750m), and from here it is easy to reach at Everest’s summit at 8,848 meters.

 

The Climb

From the base camp, the route to the summit can be divided into four separate sections: the Khumbu Icefall, the Western Cwm, the Lhotse Face and the Summit (southeast ridge).

 

The Khumbu Icefall

The Khumbu Icefall is found at the head of the Khumbu Glacier, 5,486m (18,000ft) high and not far above the base camp. Southwest of the summit, the icefall is regarded as one of the most dangerous stages of the South Col route to Everest's summit. The Khumbu Glacier forming the icefall moves at such speed that large crevasses open with little warning. The seracs (large towers of ice) found at the icefall have been known to collapse suddenly. Great blocks of ice tumble down the glacier from time to time, ranging from the size of cars to large houses. It is estimated that the glacier advances three to four feet (0.9m to 1.2m) down the mountain every day.

Since the structures are continually changing, crossing the Khumbu Icefall is extremely dangerous. Even extensive rope and ladder crossings do not always prevent loss of life. Many people have died in this area –one such climber was crushed by a twelve story block of solid ice. Exposed crevasses may be easy to avoid, but those buried under the snow can form treacherous snow bridges through which unwary climbers can fall. Extreme caution is urged at this stage of the expedition.



The Western Cwm

Walking into the Western Cwm is like entering the hall of the mountain gods. The gigantic walls of this awe-inspiring basin tower over you as we progress from Camp 1 toward the full expanse of the cwm above, with the west ridge of Everest to the left and the north face of Nuptse to the right. This is the narrowest section of the path, with gaping crevasses running across the relatively flat floor. These holes are so big that they are measured in terms of double-decker buses! Because of this, crossing them often requires stretching ladders stretched across. The crevasses add to the sense that, having passed through the labyrinth of the icefall, the gods have set one more task for you before reaching their inner sanctum. This final test usually includes at least one steep wall of ice, rising straight from the floor to produce a vertical step of about 30m (100ft), taking us up to the hallowed ground of the upper Western Cwm.

From here, with the gods gazing down from the mountain's upper ramparts, easy (but exhausting) progress is made to reach Camp 2, nestled below the west ridge just short of the foot of the southwest face.


The Lhotse Face

Early in the season, when the face is still unmarked by human progress, this steep section makes for the most grueling and technically intricate day on the mountain. Gusting winds, snow plumes, and the sight of the steep face looming above greet you at the base of Lhotse after a steady morning walk to the very end of the Cwm, above Camp 2. Careful footwork will have you ascending this section confidently, where the laser-straight ascent - rising on a slope that seems to touch your nose - is in stark contrast to the zigzag maze of the icefall below.

Arrival in Camp 3, halfway up the Lhotse Face, gives you a truly rugged, high mountain experience. Platforms cut just wide enough for the tents will have been hewn out of the thick ice by the Sherpas ahead of our arrival. Once that work has been done, it's a mass exodus of our Sherpas back down to the comforts below. The Sherpas play by Sagarmatha's rules, and for them a night on these exposed ledges is frowned upon by the mountain gods. Well, that's what they say, but since it only takes an hour or so to return below, and they can be ready for work before we climbers have even risen for breakfast, why wouldn't they take their rest lower down? For those with slower legs, we settle here on the ledge for one of the most glorious sunsets view seen by any human in all time (save the Apollo astronauts, perhaps!).

Typically, our camp is pitched in the lower neighborhood of Camp 3 (which can sprawl over several hundred meters up the slope), affording us better shelter from the winds than some of the tents perched above. After a night of re-hydration and an initial round of oxygen-rich sleep, we’ll return to the base camp and then all the way off the mountain to Dingboche. We’ll return here only once more, on the way to the summit.

When we next leave Camp 3 at 7,400m, you will be gripped by the first flush of true summit fever; down-suits donned, Top Out masks fitted, the first hiss of oxygen spreads from tent to tent as valves are cracked open. This marks the first day of climbing on "gas," and the first stage of your ascent into the "death zone."

The view does not disappoint either. The Nuptse Wall forms one half of the crescent bowl surrounding us, and the west shoulder of Everest the other. Down the valley, the towering peaks of Pumori and Lingtren, which rise with grandeur above the base camp, now look like insignificant ridges in the vast sea of Himalayan giants stretching out as far as the eye can see. The village of the base camp is long out of sight, now registered only by crackling radio transmissions during early morning calls.

The climb from Camp 3 launches another adrenaline-pumping attack on the senses as we inch up the steep Lhotse Face. Using an ascender on a fixed line, we grind up, slowly and steadily. After a grueling early morning, the effort is rewarded by a left turn across Lhotse toward the famous landmark of the Yellow Band. It's no small relief at this point, as you will have ascended some 1200m (3700ft) from Camp 2. When you look down the sweep of the Lhotse Face, our tents will appear as tiny dots, like peppercorns scattered at your feet.

 

The second section rears up and onto the rocky Geneva Spur, adding exciting scrambling to the mix. The exhilaration of scrambling in such a sensational setting, combined with the apprehension of approaching 8000m and the anxiety of catching your breath on top of the Spur while drawing heavily through the oxygen mask needs first-hand experience to comprehend. Turning the corner here, we’ll head across the home stretch to the highest camp at the South Col, on what seems to be flat ground. Now the fixed line disappears briefly, which lends an enticing sense of freedom, even though the wind usually picks up speed here, whispering caution. The last few meters of walking to the South Col inevitably brings with it a flood of emotions, since you've made all but the very last leap en route to the highest point on earth.

After a few moments of contemplation, it's down to business. Navigating toward the relative shelter of our tents, there’s an immediate dash to remove damp socks, arrange boots to dry, tie down crampons and ice axes outside, and dive into warm sleeping bags while setting to work on sparking up the stoves.


South Col to Summit

After an afternoon of rest and refreshment, as well as attempts to sleep (thwarted by excitement and adrenaline), the summit push begins between 10 p.m. and midnight. Typically the howling winds, which will accompany the team in the first hours of climbing, die down as the night continues.

We arrive at the small platform of snow known as the Balcony, where we change oxygen bottles, steal a few minutes rest, and make contact with the base camp, on standby maintaining a watchful vigil while we make for the top.

The route then turns to a sustained 300m (1000ft) climb up the southeast ridge toward the south summit. The climbing remains similar to the earlier sections: step, pause, breathe, and repeat. Passing across some rocky steps at the top of the ridge, we reach the south summit. From here the view opens up to the Hilary Step and all the way up to the top. Depending on whether we have changed oxygen bottles at the Balcony, we may switch again here.

Above the tangle of fixed lines on the 40 ft Hilary Step, it's about 100m (330ft) vertically between here and the summit. But the sheer drop down the Kangshung Face on one side and the southwest face on the other makes this section of breathtaking climbing both physically and emotionally hard. And the reward, of course, opens up at 8848m (29,028ft), where there's no higher step in the world.

We hope to be on the summit in the early morning, with plenty of time to make the long descent to the South Col. After spending another night sleeping with oxygen, the team will descend from Camp 4 on the South Col, directly to Camp 2 and then, the next day, to the base camp.

 

Day 62 - Trek down to Pangboche.

After seven hours we reach Pangboche (3930m), the oldest monastery in the region. It contains what is said to be the scalp and bones of a Yeti, or abominable snowman!  Overnight at guesthouse with a hot shower after the big adventure.

 

Day 63 - Trek to Namche Bazaar.

Leaving the mountains behind, our descent takes us through Tengboche Monastery (3860m) before continuing back to the town of Namche Bazaar (3441m), an overall trip of five and a half hours. We arrive back into Namche Bazaar in the afternoon. Overnight at guesthouse.

 

Day 64 - Trek to Lukla.

We return to Lukla (3404m), where the trip began, after a six hour trek. We’ll take time to reflect on the trek as a group, and the personal achievements of all who took part. You’ll also have plenty of time to explore the town. Overnight at guesthouse.

 

Day 65 - Morning flight back to Kathmandu.

On the scenic thirty-five minute flight back to Kathmandu, you’ll enjoy a last glimpse of the mountains you have recently climbed. Upon arrival in Kathmandu we’ll be met and transferred back to the initial hotel. Once back in Kathmandu, we will toast a drink or two to celebrate the expedition, say farewell, and thank the Sherpas and team members for their support and friendship throughout the trip. Overnight at Kathmandu hotel.

 

Day 66 - Leisure day in Kathmandu.

There’s much to see and do in Kathmandu and the surrounding areas, including Chitwan Jungle Safari, River Rafting Adventure, Kathmandu Shopping Tour or Scenic Everest Flight. This is also a spare day in the event of bad weather in Lukla.

 

Day 67 - Transfer to airport for flight departure.

Our staff will escort you to Kathmandu International Airport for your flight departure from Nepal.

Price Details

Please enquire with us for prices

 

Price Includes

  • All ground transportation by private vehicle for airport and hotel pick up/drop off, sightseeing and transfers
  • All domestic flights (if any)
  • Accommodation in teahouses and hotels
  • All meals during trek
  • Entry permit to parks, monuments, cultural landmarks and peaks if applicable
  • Trekking guide(s), porter(s) and driver(s) their daily wages, food, accommodation and other expenses
  • Comprehensive medical kit
  • In case of emergency, we can send helicopters for evacuation, manage all paperwork, and deal with related insurance companies (provided the client has valid insurance)


Price Excludes

  • International airfare and airport departure tax
  • Travel insurance covering medical treatment and evacuation by ground and air
  • Nepal entry visa, obtained upon arrival at the Tribhuwan International Airport in Kathmandu
  • Rescue and evacuation
  • Extra road transport/flight cost in case member returns earlier
  • Lunch and dinner in Kathmandu and if applicable, in Pokhara
  • Items of personal nature like laundry, communication and bar bill
  • Tips for trip staff and driver. (Tipping is appreciated)
  • Other expenses not mentioned in the Price Includes section